Year: 2022 Source: Archives of Suicide Research. (2022). 26(2), 626-640. https://doi.org/10.1080/13811118.2020.1818656 SIEC No: 20220779
Objective The current study examined suicide-related disclosure intentions in LGBTQ + youth, and the associations between reporting of lifetime experiences of minority stress and intentions to disclose suicidal thoughts. Method A sample of 592 LGBTQ + youth ages 12–24 (22.3% cisgender men, 33.1% cisgender women, 44.6% gender diverse, 75.3% white) who contacted an LGBTQ-specific crisis service, completed a survey. Results Youth reported highest intentions to disclose future suicidal ideation to LGBTQ-specific crisis services, a mental health professional, and someone they know who also identifies as LGBTQ. They reported lowest suicide-related disclosure intentions to family, spiritual counselors, and emergency room personnel. Greater lifetime minority stress was significantly associated with lower suicide-related disclosure intentions. When specific domains of minority stress were examined separately, five domains were significantly associated with lower suicide-related disclosure intentions: identity management, family rejection, homonegative communication, negative expectancies, and internalized homonegativity. However, only internalized homonegativity remained significant when they were examined simultaneously. In addition, greater lifetime minority stress was significantly associated with lower suicide-related disclosure intentions to some groups (e.g., family, friends), but not others (e.g., others who have thought about or attempted suicide, others who identify as LGBT). Conclusions Minority stress may play an important role in LGBTQ + youth’s suicide-related disclosure intentions. As such, reducing minority stress and its effects may be an important target to promote disclosure of suicidal thoughts and access to treatment among LGBTQ + youth.