Cliquez ici pour la version française

While some people who consider suicide do so fleetingly or only once in their lives, others experience these thoughts ongoing or off and on over time. Suicidal thoughts can burden people and hold them hostage. Experiencing these thoughts is to experience “absolute darkness, hopelessness, pain,” and nothing matters but stopping that pain. As friends and caregivers, we may feel at a loss to help or support people with these thoughts; we may feel that taking our loved one to the emergency room is our only option, that crisis medical support is necessary.

If the person at risk of suicide is in immediate crisis, the emergency room is an appropriate level of care. Otherwise, co-developing a safety plan is the best way forward.

This toolkit will show you what a safety plan is and how to create one together with an individual who may be at risk. It will illustrate how safety plans work and why they are one of the best tools to help mitigate future suicidal behaviours.

This toolkit is for people wishing to help someone they know who is struggling with thoughts of suicide. If you’re struggling with thoughts of suicide yourself, contact your local crisis centre for support.

A safety plan can also be used to support and guide a person who is self-harming, however, in this toolkit we focus on people with thoughts of suicide.

What is a safety plan?

A safety plan is a document that supports and guides someone when they are experiencing thoughts of suicide, to help them avoid a state of intense suicidal crisis. Anyone in a trusting relationship with the person at risk can help draft the plan; they do not need to be a professional.

When developing the plan, the person experiencing thoughts of suicide identifies:

  • their personal warning signs,
  • coping strategies that have worked for them in the past, and/or strategies they think may work in the future,
  • people who are sources of support in their lives (friends, family, professionals, crisis supports),
  • how means of suicide can be removed from their environment, and
  • their personal reasons for living, or what has helped them stay alive.

A suicidal crisis refers to “a suicide attempt or an incident in which an emotionally distraught person seriously considers or plans to imminently attempt to take his or her own life” (Suicide Prevention Resource Center, n.d.).

When is a safety plan written?

A safety plan is written when a person is not experiencing intense suicidal thoughts. It may be written after a suicidal crisis, but not during, as at this time an individual can become overwhelmed with suicidal thoughts and confusion and may not be able to think clearly. A safety plan is written when a person has hope for life, or even can consider the possibility of life, so that they can identify their reasons for living, and positive actions they can take to prevent their thoughts from becoming intense and overwhelming.

A safety plan can be developed in one sitting by the person with thoughts of suicide together with you, their caregiver or friend, or over time. The plan can change as the circumstances for the individual change and can be revised accordingly.

Man writing in notebook

Why does it work?

A safety plan is an assets-based approach designed to focus on a person’s strengths. Their unique abilities are identified and emphasized so they can draw on them when their suicidal thoughts become intense. The goal is to draw upon their strengths during subsequent recovery and healing processes (Xie, 2013). Personal resources are another integral safety plan component. Drawing on strengths is the entry-level activity; reaching out for help may also become necessary (Xie, 2013; Bergmans, personal communication, 2019).

The safety plan is organized in stages. It starts with strategies the individual can implement by themselves at home and ends with 24/7 emergency contact numbers that can be used when there is imminent danger or crisis.

The person with thoughts of suicide can verify, along with their caregiver or friend, whether coping skills are feasible, as well as whether or not the chosen contact people are appropriate (Bergmans, personal communication, 2019).

When implemented, safety plans become self-strengthening. For people who experience recurring suicidal thoughts or crises, one strength becomes knowing they have weathered the storm before and have navigated their way out.

Suicide safety plan

A comprehensive safety plan template can be found online.

Step 1: List warning signs that indicate a suicidal crisis may be developing

Guiding question(s) for the person thinking about suicide

What (situations, thoughts, feelings, body sensations, or behaviours) do you experience that let you know you are on your way to thinking about suicide, or that let you know you are mentally unwell generally? Think about some of the more subtle cues.

Examples

Situation: argument with a loved one
Thoughts: “I am so fed up with this and I can’t handle it anymore”
Body sensations: Urge to drink alcohol

Behaviours: Watch violent movies, irregular eating schedule

When to implement?

At any time before a suicidal crisis.

How to implement?

Being aware of one’s own warning signs can alert the person to the fact that they may be at high risk of thinking about suicide when these situations/thoughts/body sensations arise. They can put the plan in action and move onto the next step: coping strategies.

Being aware of personal warning signs can help friends/caregivers identify when that person may need more support, even before they’ve asked for it.

Step 2: List the coping strategies that can be used to divert thoughts, including suicidal thoughts.

Guiding question(s) for the person thinking about suicide

What (distracting activity, relaxation or soothing technique, physical activity) helps take your mind away from thought patterns that feel scary or uncomfortable, or thoughts of suicide?

Examples

Distracting activity: Watch a funny movie
Relaxation technique: Deliberate breathing
Physical activity: Go for a bike ride

When to implement?

At any time before a suicidal crisis, or when suicidal thoughts emerge but are not intense.

How to implement?

The person with thoughts of suicide can use these coping strategies to help distract them from their thoughts and move them to a more positive mental space.

Friends/caregivers can suggest to the person that they use one or more of their coping strategies and support them if needed.

Step 3: List the places and people that can be used as a distraction from thoughts of suicide.

Guiding question(s) for the person thinking about suicide

Where can you go to feel grounded, where your mind can be led away from thoughts of suicide? Who helps take your mind away from these thoughts?

Examples

Places: Go to a movie, sit in a park
People: Text friend (name, phone), go for coffee with a co-worker (name, phone)

When to implement?

At any time before a suicidal crisis, or when suicidal thoughts emerge but are not intense.

How to implement?

The person with thoughts of suicide can go to these places or contact these people to help distract them from their thoughts of suicide and move them to a more positive mental space.

Step 4: List all the people that can be contacted in a crisis, along with their contact information.

Guiding question(s) for the person thinking about suicide

Who among your friends, family, and service providers can you call when you need help (when your thoughts become overwhelming or you’re thinking about suicide)?

Examples

Mom: work phone, cell phone
Spouse: work phone, cell phone

When to implement?

At any time before a suicidal crisis, or when suicidal thoughts emerge and are becoming more intense.

How to implement?

The person with thoughts of suicide can call these people at any time, to distract them from their thoughts or to let them know when their thoughts are becoming intense, signaling that they need support.

Friends and caregivers can respond to the person by supporting them through this difficult time: listening to them, going to visit them, making sure to check in often, asking what specifically they can do to help.

Step 5: List mental health providers and the hours they can be reached, as well as 24/7 emergency contact numbers that can be accessed in a crisis.

Guiding question(s) for the person thinking about suicide

Who are the professionals you’ve worked with who can be helpful to you in a crisis? What other professionals or organizations could you call?

Examples

Therapist: work phone, cell phone, hours available
Closest hospital: Regions Hospital, 640 Jackson Street
Crisis Line: 1-833-456-4566

When to implement?

When suicidal thoughts have become very intense, and the person experiencing the thoughts believes they cannot cope on their own.

How to implement?

The person with thoughts of suicide should immediately call or visit these crisis contacts.

Step 6: List the steps to be taken to remove access to means of suicide from the environment.

Guiding question(s) for the person thinking about suicide

What could be used to die by suicide in your environment (home, work)? How have you thought about dying by suicide before, and how can you make that method more difficult to access?

Examples

Pills: Give to pharmacist or friend for disposal
Guns (or rope): Remove from home (give to a friend, etc.)

When to implement?

Before a suicidal crisis, preferably immediately after safety plan is developed.

How to implement?

The person with thoughts of suicide can remove these items from their environment themselves, giving them to friends or caregivers. The person working with them on their safety plan should confirm that all means have been removed from the home.

Friends/caregivers can offer to keep or throw away these items. Keeping a person safe from a method of suicide can mean different things for each person and method. Firearms in particular should always be removed from the home, regardless of whether or not they have been noted as a means of suicide.

Step 7: List important reasons to live, or how/why that person is still alive.

Guiding question(s) for the person thinking about suicide

When do you feel most at ease during the day? Who do you love? What do you enjoy doing? What did you used to enjoy doing? What is important to you, or used to be important to you? What has kept you alive up until now?

Note: These reasons can become apparent through conversation with the person, and through the process of a suicide intervention. You may need to identify these for the person, based on what they’ve told you.

Examples

My dog is important enough to me that I want to stay alive to take care of him.

When to implement?

At any time before or during a suicidal crisis.

How to implement?

A person with thoughts of suicide can refer to these reasons for living at any time, as often as they want, to remind them of the positive aspects of their lives.

Friends/caregivers can use these reasons in organic conversation, to help gently remind that person of their reasons for living. (Stanley & Brown, 2012)

Photo of woman with her dog, reason for living

How to co-develop a Safety Plan

Co-developing a safety plan involves a collaborative, in-depth conversation between the person experiencing thoughts of suicide and their caregiver or friend. Go over each step together, thoroughly and thoughtfully (Berk & Clarke, 2019). There may be times where, through organic or structured conversation, you will identify potential safety plan items for the person – bring these into the plan! For example, if someone mentions that they need to get home to spend time with their dog, that is a potential reason to live. You can suggest adding the positive things you hear coming from that person at any point.

“You talked about how excited your dog is to see you when you get home earlier. Can you tell me a bit more about him?” Then, “It sounds like he’s really important to you. Do you think we could add him onto your safety plan as a reason for living, or as a reason that you’re still alive?”

How to implement a Safety Plan

Once complete, you and the person who has had thoughts of suicide should keep copies of the safety plan in an accessible place. The safety plan needs to be handy so that the person can always find it when they are experiencing intense thoughts of suicide. Some people choose to always keep their plan with them, e.g. on their phone or in their wallet.

Each step in the safety plan plays a role in supporting the person with thoughts of suicide, as well as yourself, and other friends and caregivers. Refer to the “Suicide safety plan” for how and when to implement each step.

Keep in mind that the safety plan is not written in stone: it can be revised as often as is needed. The plan can be reviewed at any time, and especially if the person experiencing thoughts of suicide has found any portion of it ineffective in helping them cope with their thoughts. For example, if one contact person was found to be difficult to get in touch with on several occasions, or if a coping strategy is no longer effective or accessible.

Is a safety plan the same as a no-suicide contract?

A no-suicide contract is different from a safety plan in that it is “an agreement, usually written, between a mental health service user and clinician, whereby the service user pledges not to harm himself or herself” (McMyler & Prymachuk, 2008, p.512). It was introduced in 1973 by Robert Drye, Robert Goulding and Mary Goulding. Mental health service users are expected to seek help when they feel they can no longer honour their commitment to the contract (Rudd, Mandrusiak & Joiner, 2006).

The no-suicide contract has been widely used by clinicians working with patients at risk of suicide (Rudd, Mandrusiak & Joiner, 2006). However, there is a lack of evidence to support contracts as clinically effective tools. Both service users and clinicians have voiced strong opposition to their use. Moreover, important ethical and conceptual issues in the use of such contracts have been identified, including the potential for coercion from the clinician for their own protection and the ethical implications of restricting a service user’s choices when they may be already struggling for control. A strength-based approach like a safety plan, on the contrary, not only encourages the service user’s input and agency, it is a true partnership with the physician or caregiver, bound by hope (McMyler & Prymachuk, 2008; Rudd, Mandrusiak & Joiner, 2006).

References

Berk, M. & Clarke, S. (2019). Safety planning and risk management. In M. Berk (Ed.), Evidence-based treatment approaches for suicidal adolescents: Translating science into practice (63-84). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

Drye, R., Gouling, R. & Goulding, M. (1973). No-suicide decisions: Patient monitoring of suicidal risk. American Journal of Psychiatry, 130(2), 171-174.

McMyler, C. & Prymachuk, S. (2008). Do “no-suicide’ contacts work? Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 15(6),512-522.

Rudd, M., Mandriusiak, M. & Joiner, T. (2006). The case against no-suicide contracts: the commitment to treatment statement as a practice alternative. Journal of Clinical Psychology. DOI:10.1002/jclp.20227

Stanley, B. & Brown, G. (2011). Safety plan. Retrieved from http://suicidesafetyplan.com/uploads/SAFETY_PLAN_form_8.21.12.pdf

Stanley, B. & Brown, G. (2012). Safety planning intervention: A brief intervention to mitigate suicide risk. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 19(2), 256-264.

Suicide Prevention Resource Center. (n.d.) Topics and terms. Retrieved from https://www.sprc.org/about-suicide/topics-terms

Xie, H. (2013). Strengths-based approach for mental health recovery. Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, 7(2), 5-10. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3939995

Plans de sécurité pour la prévention du suicide

TÉLÉCHARGER LE PDF

Bien que certaines personnes songent au suicide très brièvement ou seulement une fois dans leur vie, d’autres y pensent de façon continuelle ou intermittente au fil du temps. Les pensées suicidaires peuvent constituer un véritable fardeau pour les gens, et les tenir en otage. Être en proie à ces pensées, c’est faire l’expérience de l’obscurité absolue, du désespoir, de la douleur, et rien n’a d’importance si ce n’est d’arrêter cette souffrance.

En tant qu’amis et aidants, nous pouvons nous sentir démunis devant l’idée d’aider ou de soutenir ces personnes; nous pouvons croire que notre seule option est d’emmener notre proche aux urgences, qu’un soutien médical d’urgence est nécessaire.

Si la personne présentant un risque suicidaire est actuellement en situation de crise, la salle d’urgence offre en effet le niveau de soins approprié. Autrement, l’élaboration d’un plan de sécurité avec la collaboration d’une autre personne est la meilleure façon de procéder.

Cette trousse d’outils explique en quoi consiste un plan de sécurité, la manière de créer un tel plan avec une personne potentiellement à risque, le fonctionnement des plans de sécurité, et les raisons pour lesquelles ils font partie des meilleurs outils pour atténuer les comportements suicidaires éventuels.

Cette trousse d’outils est destinée aux gens qui veulent aider une personne de leur entourage qui est aux prises avec des pensées suicidaires. Si vous faites face à de telles pensées, veuillez communiquer avec votre centre d’intervention local en cas de crise pour obtenir de l’aide.

Un plan de sécurité peut également servir à soutenir et à guider une personne qui s’automutile. Cependant, nous mettons l’accent dans cette trousse sur les personnes qui ont des pensées suicidaires.

Qu’est-ce qu’un plan de sécurité?

Un plan de sécurité est un document qui soutient et guide une personne qui fait face à des pensées suicidaires; il a pour but d’aider la personne à éviter une crise suicidaire intense.

Toute personne ayant une relation de confiance avec la personne à risque peut l’aider à rédiger le plan de sécurité; il n’est pas nécessaire que l’aidant soit un professionnel dans le domaine.

Au cours de l’élaboration du plan, la personne qui a des pensées suicidaires fait part
de ce qui suit :

  • ses facteurs de risques personnels;
  • les stratégies d’adaptation qui ont fonctionné pour elle dans le passé, ou les stratégies qui, selon elle, pourraient fonctionner à l’avenir;
  • les personnes qui sont des sources de soutien dans sa vie (amis, famille, professionnels, intervenants en cas de crise);
  • les mesures à prendre pour éliminer l’accès aux moyens se suicider dans son environnement;
  • ses raisons personnelles pour vivre ou les personnes ou les choses qui l’aident à rester en vie.

Une crise suicidaire désigne une tentative de suicide ou un incident au cours duquel une personne perturbée émotionnellement envisage sérieusement ou prévoit s’enlever la vie dans un proche avenir (Suicide Prevention Resource Center, sans date).

Quand rédige-t-on un plan de sécurité?

Un plan de sécurité est rédigé lorsque la personne ne ressent pas de pensées suicidaires intenses. Il peut être rédigé après une crise suicidaire, mais pas pendant celle-ci, car les pensées suicidaires et la confusion risquent d’empêcher la personne de penser clairement. La rédaction du plan doit se faire lorsque l’individu a de l’espoir dans la vie, ou peut même envisager la possibilité de vivre. Il peut ainsi définir ses raisons de vivre et les actions positives qu’il peut entreprendre pour éviter que ses pensées deviennent intenses et accablantes.

La personne qui a des pensées suicidaires, en collaboration avec vous, son aidant ou son ami, peut élaborer le plan de sécurité en une seule ou en plusieurs séances. Le plan est sujet à des changements selon l’évolution des circonstances particulières de la personne; il peut donc être révisé en conséquence.

Pourquoi le plan de sécurité fonctionne-t-il?

La rédaction d’un plan de sécurité est une démarche basée sur les forces de la personne. Les capacités uniques de cette dernière sont déterminées et mises en valeur afin de lui permettre d’y puiser en cas de pensées suicidaires intenses. L’objectif est de l’inciter à faire appel à ces forces au cours des processus de rétablissement et de guérison qui s’ensuivent (Xie, 2013).        Les ressources personnelles représentent un autre élément essentiel du plan de sécurité. Il est important que la personne s’appuie sur ses points forts dans un premier temps, mais il peut également devenir nécessaire de demander de l’aide (Xie, 2013; Bergmans, communication personnelle, 2019).

Le plan de sécurité comporte plusieurs étapes. Il mise initialement sur des stratégies que la personne peut mettre en œuvre seule, chez elle, et se termine par une liste de numéros d’urgence accessibles 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, en cas de danger ou de crise imminente.

La personne ayant des pensées suicidaires peut vérifier, avec son aidant ou son ami, si ses habiletés d’adaptation sont suffisantes, et si les personnes-ressources choisies sont appropriées ou non. Des solutions de rechange peuvent être proposées par l’une ou l’autre des parties selon les besoins (Bergmans, communication personnelle, 2019).

Lorsqu’ils sont mis en œuvre, les plans de sécurité ont un effet d’auto-renforcement. Pour les personnes qui ont des pensées suicidaires ou des crises récurrentes, la reconnaissance du fait qu’elles ont déjà traversé la tempête et qu’elles ont réussi à s’en sortir devient une force.

Plan de sécurité pour la prévention du suicide

Pour télécharger un fichier du modèle

1re Étape : Énumérer les signes qui pourraient indiquer qu’une crise suicidaire se dessine

Questions et réflexions pour une personne qui a des pensées suicidaires

Quels comportements, situations, pensées, émotions ou sensations corporelles vous signalent que vous êtes sur le point d’avoir des idées suicidaires ou que votre santé mentale générale est en jeu? Pensez à certains des signes les plus subtils.

Exemples

Situation : Dispute avec un proche.

Pensées : « Je suis tellement tanné de tout ça! Je n’en peux plus! »

Sensations corporelles : Envie intense de boire de l’alcool.

Comportement : Regarder des films violents, manger de façon irrégulière.

Quand faut-il mettre le plan de sécurité en œuvre?

À tout moment, avant qu’une crise suicidaire se déclenche.

Comment faut-il le mettre en œuvre?

Le fait de reconnaître ses propres signes avant-coureurs peut sensibiliser la personne au fait qu’elle s’expose à un risque élevé d’avoir des pensées suicidaires quand ces situations, pensées ou sensations apparaissent. La personne peut mettre son plan de sécurité en marche et passer à la prochaine étape : les stratégies d’adaptation.

Savoir reconnaître les signes avant-coureurs de la personne peut aider les amis et les aidants à déterminer les moments où celle-ci a besoin d’une aide supplémentaire, avant même qu’elle ne la demande.

(Stanley et Brown, 2012)

2e Étape : Énumérer les stratégies d’adaptation qui peuvent être utilisées pour détourner l’attention de certaines pensées, y compris les pensées suicidaires

Questions et réflexions pour une personne qui a des pensées suicidaires

Quelle activité, technique de relaxation, technique apaisante ou activité physique vous aide-t-elle à vous détourner des modèles de pensées qui vous effraient ou vous perturbent, y compris les pensées suicidaires?

Exemples

Diversion : Regarder un film drôle

Technique de relaxation : Respiration contrôlée

Activité physique : Se promener à vélo

Quand faut-il mettre le plan de sécurité en œuvre?

À tout moment avant une crise suicidaire, ou quand les pensées suicidaires font surface sans être intenses.

Comment faut-il le mettre en œuvre?

La personne aux prises avec des idées suicidaires peut utiliser ces stratégies d’adaptation afin de l’aider à se détourner de ces pensées et à entrer dans un état d’esprit plus positif.

Les amis et les aidants peuvent suggérer à la personne d’utiliser l’une ou plusieurs de ses stratégies d’adaptation et lui apporter du soutien si nécessaire.

3e Étape : Dresser la liste des lieux et des personnes qui peuvent aider la personne concernée à détourner son attention des pensées suicidaires

Questions et réflexions pour une personne qui a des pensées suicidaires

Où pouvez-vous vous rendre pour vous sentir ancré et pour vous détourner des pensées suicidaires? Qui vous aide à vous détourner de ces pensées?

Exemples

Lieux : Aller au cinéma, s’asseoir dans un parc.

Gens : Envoyer un texto à un ami (nom, n° de téléphone); sortir prendre un café avec un collègue (nom, n° de téléphone).

Quand faut-il mettre le plan de sécurité en œuvre?

À tout moment avant une crise suicidaire, ou quand les pensées suicidaires font surface sans être intenses.

Comment faut-il le mettre en œuvre?

La personne aux prises avec des idées suicidaires peut utiliser ces stratégies d’adaptation afin de l’aider à se détourner de ces pensées et à entrer dans un état d’esprit plus positif.

4e Étape : Dresser la liste de toutes les personnes qui sont accessibles en cas de crise ainsi que leurs coordonnées

Questions et réflexions pour une personne qui a des pensées suicidaires

Parmi vos amis, les membres de votre famille et vos fournisseurs de soins, qui pouvez-vous appeler quand vous avez besoin d’aide (quand vos pensées deviennent envahissantes ou que vous songez au suicide)?

Exemples

Maman : no de téléphone au travail, no de téléphone cellulaire.

Conjoint(e) : no de téléphone au travail, no de téléphone cellulaire.

Quand faut-il mettre le plan de sécurité en œuvre?

À tout moment avant une crise suicidaire, ou quand les pensées suicidaires font surface sans être intenses.

Comment faut-il le mettre en œuvre?

La personne ayant des pensées suicidaires peut appeler ces gens à tout moment pour se faire aider à se détourner de ces pensées ou pour signaler que ses pensées deviennent plus intenses, indiquant qu’elle a besoin de soutien.

En guise de réponse, les amis et les aidants de la personne peuvent l’appuyer durant cette période difficile de diverses façons : en l’écoutant, en lui rendant visite, en prenant souvent de ses nouvelles, et en lui demandant de préciser ce qu’ils peuvent faire pour l’aider.

(Stanley et Brown, 2012)

5e Étape : Dresser une liste des noms des fournisseurs de soins de santé mentale en indiquant les heures auxquelles on peut les joindre et les numéros d’urgence accessibles 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, en cas de crise

Questions et réflexions pour une personne qui a des pensées suicidaires

Parmi les professionnels avec lesquels vous avez collaboré, lesquels pourraient vous aider si vous viviez une crise? Quels autres professionnels ou quelles organisations pourriez-vous appeler?

Exemples

Thérapeute : no de téléphone au travail, no de téléphone cellulaire, heures de consultation.

Hôpital le plus proche : Hôpital régional X, 640, rue YYY.

Ligne d’écoute en cas de crise : 1 833 456-4566

Quand faut-il mettre le plan de sécurité en œuvre?

Lorsque les pensées suicidaires sont devenues intenses et que la personne ne croit pas pouvoir composer avec la situation par elle-même.

Comment faut-il le mettre en œuvre?

La personne qui a des pensées suicidaires doit immédiatement appeler ses personnes-ressources ou se rendre au point de service d’urgence pertinent.

(Stanley et Brown, 2012)

6e Étape : Énumérer les mesures à prendre pour éliminer de l’environnement l’accès aux moyens pour s’enlever la vie.

Questions et réflexions pour une personne qui a des pensées suicidaires

Que pourriez-vous utiliser pour vous enlever la vie dans votre environnement (à la maison ou au travail)? Par quels moyens avez-vous pensé vous enlever la vie par le passé, et de quelle façon pourriez-vous rendre ces moyens plus difficiles d’accès?

Exemples

Pilules : À confier au pharmacien ou à un ami pour élimination.

Fusils (ou corde) : À retirer de la maison (confier à un ami, etc.).

Quand faut-il mettre le plan de sécurité en œuvre?

Avant de vivre une crise, de préférence immédiatement après avoir dressé le plan de sécurité.

Comment faut-il le mettre en œuvre?

La personne qui a des pensées suicidaires peut retirer elle-même ces objets de son environnement et les confier à des amis ou à des aidants. La personne qui collabore à l’élaboration du plan de sécurité doit confirmer que tous ces moyens ont été retirés du domicile de la personne concernée.

Les amis et les aidants peuvent offrir de garder ces objets ou de s’en débarrasser. La manière de protéger une personne contre un moyen de suicide particulier peut varier selon l’individu et le moyen visé. Les armes à feu, en particulier, devraient toujours être retirées du domicile, qu’elles aient été ou non notées comme moyen de suicide.

(Stanley et Brown, 2012)

7e Étape : Énumérer les principaux facteurs qui donnent à la personne l’envie de vivre, ou les raisons pour lesquelles elle est encore en vie

Questions et réflexions pour une personne qui a des pensées suicidaires

À quel moment de la journée vous sentez-vous le plus à l’aise? Qui aimez-vous? Qu’est-ce que vous aimez faire? Qu’aimiez-vous faire par le passé? Qu’est-ce qui est important pour vous actuellement, ou qu’est-ce qui était important pour vous par le passé? Quelles sont les choses ou les personnes qui vous ont tenu en vie jusqu’à maintenant? Nota : Ces raisons peuvent se dégager d’une conversation avec la personne, et du processus d’intervention en cas de suicide. Il est possible que vous deviez les cerner pour la personne en fonction de ce qu’elle vous a dit.

Exemples

Mon chien me tient suffisamment à cœur pour que je veuille rester en vie pour m’occuper de lui.

Quand faut-il mettre le plan de sécurité en œuvre?

À tout moment avant ou pendant une crise suicidaire.

Comment faut-il le mettre en œuvre?

Une personne qui a des pensées suicidaires peut consulter ses raisons de vivre n’importe quand et aussi souvent qu’elle le veut pour se rappeler les aspects positifs de sa vie.

Les amis et les aidants peuvent évoquer ces raisons au cours de conversations spontanées, naturelles, en vue de rappeler discrètement à la personne ce qui lui donne envie de vivre.

(Stanley et Brown, 2012)

Comment participe-t-on à l’élaboration d’un plan de sécurité?

L’élaboration d’un plan de sécurité par la personne qui a des pensées suicidaires, en collaboration avec son aidant ou son ami, nécessite une conversation approfondie.

Ensemble, passez en revue chaque étape de manière approfondie et réfléchie (Berk et Clarke, 2019). Si, dans le cadre d’une conversation spontanée ou structurée, vous recensez des éléments éventuels du plan de sécurité pour la personne, intégrez-les dans le plan! Par exemple, si la personne mentionne qu’elle doit rentrer chez elle pour passer du temps avec son chien, le chien pourrait être une raison possible de vivre. Vous pouvez suggérer l’ajout d’éléments positifs que vous entendez de la part de cette personne à tout moment.

« Tu as dit que ton chien est très excité de te voir quand tu rentres plus tôt à la maison. Peux-tu m’en parler un peu plus? » Ensuite : « On dirait que tu tiens beaucoup à ton chien. Penses-tu que nous pourrions l’ajouter à ton plan de sécurité comme une raison de vivre, ou comme une raison pour laquelle tu es toujours en vie? »

Comment met-on en œuvre un plan de sécurité?

Une fois le plan de sécurité terminé, vous et la personne concernée devez en conserver des exemplaires dans un endroit accessible. Le plan de sécurité doit être à portée de la main de la personne afin qu’elle puisse le trouver lorsqu’elle a des pensées suicidaires intenses. Certaines personnes choisissent de garder leur plan à portée de la main en tout temps (p. ex. : en format électronique sur leur téléphone cellulaire ou en copie papier dans leur portefeuille).

Chaque étape du plan de sécurité joue un rôle dans le soutien apporté à la personne ayant des pensées suicidaires, ainsi qu’à vous-même et aux autres amis et aidants. Pour vous informer de la manière et du moment de mettre en œuvre chaque étape, consultez le plan de sécurité pour la prévention du suicide.

N’oubliez pas que le plan de sécurité n’est pas gravé dans la pierre : il peut être révisé aussi souvent que nécessaire et à tout moment, particulièrement si la personne qui a des pensées suicidaires estime qu’une partie du plan ne l’aide pas à faire face à ses pensées (p. ex. : si une personne-ressource a été difficile à joindre à plusieurs reprises, ou si une stratégie d’adaptation n’est plus efficace ou accessible).

Un plan de sécurité est-il équivalent à un contrat de non-suicide?

Un contrat de non-suicide et un plan de sécurité sont deux choses distinctes. Le premier est une entente, généralement écrite, entre un usager des services de santé mentale et un clinicien, selon laquelle l’usager s’engage à ne pas se faire mal (McMyler et Prymachuk, 2008, p. 512). L’idée d’un tel plan a été proposée par Robert Drye, Robert Goulding et Mary Goulding en 1973. Les usagers des services de santé mentale sont censés demander de l’aide lorsqu’ils estiment qu’ils ne peuvent plus honorer l’engagement pris en vertu du contrat (Rudd, Mandrusiak et Joiner, 2006).

Le contrat de non-suicide a été largement utilisé par les cliniciens auprès des patients présentant un risque de suicide (Rudd, Mandrusiak et Joiner, 2006). Toutefois, l’efficacité clinique de ces contrats reste à démontrer.

Autant les utilisateurs de services que les cliniciens ont exprimé leur forte opposition à l’utilisation de tels contrats. De plus, d’importantes questions éthiques et conceptuelles liées à l’utilisation de ces contrats ont été soulevées, notamment le risque de coercition de la part du clinicien pour sa propre protection, et les conséquences éthiques relatives à la restriction des choix d’un utilisateur de services qui désire au contraire maîtriser la situation. En revanche, une approche fondée sur les forces, comme un plan de sécurité, non seulement encourage la participation et l’intervention de l’utilisateur de services, mais favorise aussi la création d’un véritable partenariat fondé sur l’espoir avec le médecin ou l’aidant (McMyler et Prymachuk, 2008; Rudd, Mandrusiak et Joiner, 2006).

Références

Berk, M. et Clarke, S. (2019). Safety planning and risk management. In M. Berk (Ed.), Evidence-based treatment approaches for suicidal adolescents: Translating science into practice (63-84). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

Drye, R., Gouling, R. et Goulding, M. (1973). No-suicide decisions: Patient monitoring of suicidal risk. American Journal of Psychiatry, 130(2), 171-174.

McMyler, C. et Prymachuk, S. (2008). Do “no-suicide” contacts work? Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 15(6), 512-522.

Rudd, M., Mandriusiak, M. et Joiner, T. (2006). The case against no-suicide contracts: the commitment to treatment statement as a practice alternative. Journal of Clinical Psychology. DOI:10.1002/jclp.20227

Stanley, B. et Brown, G. (2011). Safety plan. Extrait de http://suicidesafetyplan.com/uploads/SAFETY_PLAN_form_8.21.12.pdf

Stanley, B. et Brown, G. (2012). Safety planning intervention: A brief intervention to mitigate suicide risk. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 19(2), 256-264.

Suicide Prevention Resource Center (sans date). Topics and terms. Extrait de https://www.sprc.org/about-suicide/topics-terms

Xie, H. (2013). Strengths-based approach for mental health recovery. Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science 7(2), 5-10. Extrait de https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3939995