Cliquez ici pour la version française

Click here to view all our fact sheets on suicide.

We also have a toolkit on sexual minorities and suicide. 

These fact sheets are a collaboration between the Centre for Suicide Prevention and the Mental Health Commission of Canada.


LGB people face stressors that are unique, including the experience of discrimination and institutional prejudice. Studies and surveys have shown many LGB people have thought about or attempted suicide, and previous behaviours such as these are the most reliable indicators of future suicide risk (Suicide Prevention Resource Center [SPRC] & Rodgers, 2011).

Sexual orientation includes sexual behaviour, romantic attraction and self-identification.

Sexual minorities generally refer to those who have a different sexual orientation than the majority population.

LGBTQ2S+ is an acronym for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning, and Two-Spirit. We refer only to LGB people in this fact sheet because the research we cite refers specifically to these groups. We have a separate transgender and suicide-specific fact sheet, and acknowledge that more research into queer, questioning and Two-Spirit people and suicide is needed.

Statistics

Approximately 3% of the Canadian adult population identified as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (Statistics Canada, 2017) Lesbian, gay and bisexual youth are: 5 times more likely to consider suicide 7 times more likely to attempt suicide (Suicide Prevention Resource Centre [SPRC], 2008)

Why are LGB people at risk?

There are a few factors that put LGB people at risk of suicide, factors that can put strain on one’s mental health and potentially lead to thoughts of suicide:

  • Discrimination manifesting as bullying, physical violence, rejection (leading to isolation); this is especially prevalent among LGB youth who are at higher risk for suicide than LGB adults
  • Lack of support from family members, which can also lead to isolation
  • Predisposition to depression, anxiety and substance abuse
  • LGB individuals who consider suicide face the stigma of being different in sexual orientation and the stigma of suicide in general
  • Institutional prejudice (laws and public policies which create inequalities and/or fail to provide protection from sexual-orientation-based discrimination)

(Haas et al., 2011; SPRC, 2008; Pachankis et al., 2015)

What can reduce risk?

  • Effective mental health care and health care
  • Community and school supports
  • Strong relationships with family and friends
  • Self-awareness and acceptance
  • Independence of thought (ability to see past the traditional views of society)

(Saewyc et al., 2014; Haas et al., 2011)

Warning signs

Any significant change in behaviour or mood is a warning sign that someone may be thinking about suicide, for example:

  • Losing interest in a previously enjoyed hobby or activity
  • Disconnecting from friends or family
  • Change in sleeping or eating patterns
  • Drinking alcohol or taking drugs to excess

Statements of hopelessness can also be a warning sign, or talk of being a burden:

  • “I don’t fit in at all with my classmates… it feels like I’m the only gay person I know”
  • “I wish my family members would accept me for who I am… I feel like I have no one in my family to talk to”

Man, youth, alone

If you notice anyone exhibiting the following signs get that person help immediately – call 9-1-1 or your local crisis centre.

  • Threatening to hurt or kill themselves
  • Talking or writing about dying or suicide
  • Seeking out ways to kill themselves

(American Association of Suicidology, 2017)

What can communities do to help reduce suicide among LGB people?

The implementation of policies and laws that protect LGB people from sexual-orientation-based discrimination and encourage acceptance can reduce suicide risk. For example:

  • Schools can implement safe-school policies specifically addressing homophobia (Saewyc et al., 2014; Egale, 2011).
  • Health care workers can learn how to identify and reach out to LGB people who may be at risk of suicide.

What can we all do to help reduce suicide among LGB people?

If someone you know is exhibiting warning signs, have an open, non-judgmental conversation with them. You can start the conversation by mentioning your concerns, “I’ve noticed you’re not coming to class as often as you used to, how’re you doing?” or, “You say your mom hasn’t been very supportive since you’ve come out to her. Are you okay?” Listen to them, be there for them. You don’t have to offer solutions. If the person responds with statements of hopelessness or being a burden, ask them about those feelings. Then, ask them directly, “Are you thinking about killing yourself?”

What can LGB people do to stay mentally healthy?

  • Hang out with people who are loving and supportive.
    Prioritize relationships with supportive family members and friends and consider becoming involved in LGB community organizations or Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs).
  • Maintain mental health and ask for help when it is needed!
    Try to limit alcohol and drug use and if support is needed, reach out for help. When struggling to cope with life, tell a trusted loved one or call your local crisis line which you can find online at http://suicideprevention.ca/need-help/.

Resource

Egale Canada

References

American Association of Suicidology. (2013). Know the warning signs. Retrieved from http://www.suicidology.org/resources/warning-signs

Egale Canada. (2011). Every Class in Every School: The first national climate survey on homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia in Canadian schools (Final Report – May 2011). Retrieved from http://archive.egale.ca/index.asp?lang=E&menu=4&item=1489

Haas, A., Eliason, M., Mays, V., Mathy, R., Cochran, S., D’Augelli, A. (2011). Suicide and suicide risk in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender populations: Review and recommendations. Journal of Homosexuality, 58(1),10-51. https://doi.org/10.1080/00918369.2011.534038

Saewyc, E.,  Konishi,C.,  Rose, H.,  & Homma, Y.( 2014). School-based strategies to reduce suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and discrimination among sexual minority and heterosexual adolescents in western Canada. International Journal of Child and Youth Family Studies, 5(1), 89-112. https://doi.org/10.18357/ijcyfs.saewyce.512014

Statistics Canada. (2017). Same sex couples and sexual orientation. Retrieved from https://www.statcan.gc.ca/eng/dai/smr08/2015/smr08_203_2015#a3

Suicide Prevention Resource Center. (2008). Suicide risk and prevention in gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youth. Newton, MA: Education Development Center, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/migrate/library/SPRC_LGBT_Youth.pdf

Suicide Prevention Resource Center & Rodgers, P. (2011). Understanding risk and protective factors for suicide: A primer for preventing suicide. Newton, MA: Education Development Center, Inc. Retrieved from http://www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/migrate/library/RiskProtectiveFactorsPrimer.pdf

Les minorités sexuelles et le suicide

TÉLÉCHARGER

Les personnes LGB font face à des facteurs de stress particuliers, notamment la discrimination et le préjudice institutionnel. Des études et des enquêtes montrent que de nombreuses personnes LGB ont pensé au suicide ou tenté de se suicider, et que ces comportements antérieurs sont des indicateurs très fiables du risque futur de suicide (Suicide Prevention Resource Center [SPRC] et Rodgers, 2011).

L’orientation sexuelle englobe le comportement sexuel, l’attirance romantique et l’auto‑identification.

Les minorités sexuelles réfèrent généralement aux personnes qui ont une orientation sexuelle différente de celle de la majorité de la population.

LGBTQ2S+ est un acronyme désignant les personnes d’orientation lesbienne, gaie, bisexuelle, transgenre, allosexuelle ou en questionnement et bispirituelle. Nous ne faisons référence qu’aux personnes LGB dans cette fiche de renseignements, car la recherche que nous citons se réfère spécifiquement à ce groupe. Nous disposons d’une fiche de renseignements distincte portant sur le suicide et les personnes transgenres, et nous sommes d’avis qu’il est nécessaire de mener davantage de recherches en ce qui a trait au suicide en lien avec les personnes allosexuelles, en questionnement et bispirituelles.

Statistiques

Environ 3 % de la population adulte canadienne s’identifie comme étant lesbienne, gaie ou bisexuelle (Statistique Canada, 2017) Les jeunes lesbiennes, gais et bisexuels sont : 5 fois plus susceptibles de penser au suicide 7 fois plus susceptibles de faire une tentative de suicide (Suicide Prevention Resource Centre [SPRC], 2008)

Pourquoi les personnes LGB sont-elles à risque?

Certains facteurs exposent les personnes LGB au risque de suicide, pourraient nuire à leur santé mentale et éventuellement donner lieu à des idées suicidaires :

  1. Discrimination se traduisant par de l’intimidation, de la violence physique, du rejet (menant à l’isolement); cela est particulièrement répandu chez les jeunes LGB, et ils présentent d’ailleurs un risque plus élevé de suicide que les adultes LGB
  2. Manque de soutien de la part des membres de la famille, ce qui peut également engendrer l’isolement
  3. Prédisposition à la dépression, à l’anxiété et à la toxicomanie
  4. Les personnes LGB qui songent à se suicider sont confrontées à la stigmatisation liée à l’orientation sexuelle et à la stigmatisation liée au suicide en général
  5. Préjudice institutionnel (lois et politiques publiques qui créent des inégalités et [ou] qui ne protègent pas contre la discrimination fondée sur l’orientation sexuelle)

(Haas et coll., 2011; SPRC, 2008; Pachankis et coll., 2015)

Qu’est-ce qui peut contribuer à réduire les risques?

  1. Soins de santé mentale et soins de santé efficaces
  2. Mesures de soutien communautaire et scolaire
  3. Relations solides avec la famille et les amis
  4. Conscience de soi et acceptation
  5. Indépendance d’esprit (capacité de voir au-delà des conceptions traditionnelles de la société)

(Saewyc et coll., 2014; Haas et coll., 2011)

Signes précurseurs

Tout changement important dans le comportement ou l’humeur d’une personne pourrait être un signe avant-coureur de suicide. Voici quelques exemples de signes associés au suicide :

  1. Désintérêt pour un passe-temps ou une activité qui était synonyme de plaisir avant
  2. Perte de contact avec ses amis ou sa famille
  3. Changement des habitudes alimentaires ou de sommeil
  4. Consommation abusive d’alcool ou de drogues

Tenir des propos de désespoir peut aussi constituer un signe de détresse, ou encore parler de soi comme étant un fardeau :

  • « Je n’ai pas du tout ma place avec mes camarades de classe… j’ai l’impression d’être la seule personne homosexuelle que je connaisse. »
  • « J’aimerais que les membres de ma famille m’acceptent comme je suis… j’ai l’impression de n’avoir personne à qui parler dans ma famille. »

Man, youth, alone

Si vous remarquez un des signes de détresse suivants chez quelqu’un, portez-lui immédiatement secours en appelant le 9-1-1 ou en communiquant avec le centre local de soutien en cas de crise :

  • Menacer de se blesser ou de se suicider
  • Parler ou écrire au sujet de la mort ou du suicide
  • Chercher des moyens de se suicider

(American Association of Suicidology, 2017)

Que peuvent faire les collectivités pour réduire le risque de suicide chez les personnes LGB?

La mise en œuvre de politiques et de lois qui protègent les personnes LGB de la discrimination fondée sur l’orientation sexuelle, et qui visent l’acceptation, peuvent contribuer à réduire les risques de suicide. En voici quelques exemples :

  • Les écoles peuvent mettre en œuvre des politiques de sécurité visant expressément à lutter contre l’homophobie (Saewyc et coll., 2014; Egale, 2011).
  • Les travailleurs de la santé peuvent apprendre à repérer les personnes LGB susceptibles de se suicider, et leur tendre la main.

Que pouvons-nous tous faire pour réduire le risque de suicide chez les personnes LGB?

Si vous connaissez quelqu’un qui présente des signes avant-coureurs de suicide, discutez ouvertement avec lui, sans porter de jugement. Vous pouvez commencer la conversation en faisant part de vos préoccupations : « J’ai remarqué que tu ne venais pas en classe aussi souvent qu’avant, est-ce que ça va? » ou « Tu dis que ta mère n’a pas démontré beaucoup de soutien depuis tu es sorti du placard. Comment te sens-tu? » Écoutez la personne, soyez là pour elle. Vous n’avez pas à lui proposer de solutions. Si la personne semble découragée ou qu’elle a l’impression d’être un fardeau pour son entourage, interrogez-la sur ces sentiments. Puis, posez-lui la question suivante directement : « Est-ce que tu penses au suicide? »

Que peuvent faire les personnes LGB pour demeurer en bonne santé mentale?

  1. S’entourer de personnes aimantes et qui offrent leur soutien.
    Il est important de prioriser les relations avec les membres de la famille et les amis qui offrent leur soutien, et d’envisager une implication auprès d’organismes de la communauté LGB ou des alliances gais-hétéros (Gay-Straight Alliances [GSA]).
  2. Maintenir une bonne santé mentale et demander de l’aide quand c’est nécessaire!
    Limiter la consommation d’alcool et de drogues, et chercher à obtenir un soutien en cas de besoin. Lorsqu’il est difficile de faire face à la vie, il faut en parler à un proche de confiance ou appeler la ligne d’écoute téléphonique de sa région qui se trouve en ligne à :http://suicideprevention.ca/need-help/.

Ressources

Egale Canada

Références

American Association of Suicidology. (2013). Know the warning signs. Extrait du site http://www.suicidology.org/resources/warning-signs

Egale Canada (2011). Every Class in Every School: The first national climate survey on homophobia, biphobia, and transphobia in Canadian schools (Rapport final – mai 2011). Extrait du site http://archive.egale.ca/index.asp?lang=E&menu=4&item=1489

Haas, A., Eliason, M., Mays, V., Mathy, R., Cochran, S., D’Augelli, A. (2011). Suicide and suicide risk in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender populations: Review and recommendations. Journal of Homosexuality, 58(1), pages 10 à 51. https://doi.org/10.1080/00918369.2011.534038

Saewyc, E.,  Konishi,C.,  Rose, H., et Homma, Y. (2014). School-based strategies to reduce suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and discrimination among sexual minority and heterosexual adolescents in western Canada. International Journal of Child and Youth Family Studies, 5(1), pages 89 à 112. https://doi.org/10.18357/ijcyfs.saewyce.512014

Statistique Canada. (2017). Les couples de même sexe et l’orientation sexuelle. Extrait du site https://www.statcan.gc.ca/fra/quo/smr08/2015/smr08_203_2015

Suicide Prevention Resource Center. (2008). Suicide risk and prevention in gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youth. Newton, Massachusetts : Education Development Center, Inc. Consulté à l’adresse http://www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/migrate/library/SPRC_LGBT_Youth.pdf

Suicide Prevention Resource Center et Rodgers, P. (2011). Understanding Risk and Protective Factors for Suicide: A Primer for Preventing Suicide. Newton, Massachusetts : Education Development Center, Inc. Consulté à l’adresse http://www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/migrate/library/RiskProtectiveFactorsPrimer.pdf


À propos du Centre for Suicide Prevention
Tout le monde peut apprendre à reconnaître une personne à risque de se suicider et lui trouver de l’aide. Appelez-nous. Nous sommes le Centre for Suicide Prevention, une branche de l’Association canadienne pour la santé mentale. Depuis plus de 35 ans, nous fournissons à la population canadienne les connaissances et les compétences requises pour intervenir auprès de personnes à risque de se suicider. Nous pouvons vous procurer les bons outils. Une éducation pour la vie.

À propos de la Commission de la santé mentale du Canada
La Commission de la santé mentale du Canada (CSMC) joue un rôle catalyseur dans l’amélioration du système de santé mentale et la transformation des attitudes et des comportements de la population canadienne à l’égard des problèmes de santé mentale.

À propos de l’Association canadienne pour la prévention du suicide
L’Association canadienne pour la prévention du suicide (ACPS) a été incorporée en 1985 par un groupe de professionnels qui jugeaient essentiel de fournir de l’information et des ressources aux collectivités afin de réduire les taux de suicide et d’atténuer les conséquences dévastatrices des comportements suicidaires.

Si vous êtes en crise, appelez la ligne d’écoute téléphonique de votre région.